First cell gene therapy to treat “Bubble boy” disease has been legalised in Europe

Last July, an article was published in medical journal Blood, which described the success of a cell gene therapy modality to treat the immunodeficiency caused by adenosine deaminase deficiency – “Bubble boy” disease. This is a disease that alters purine...

Mediterranean anaemia can be treated using gene therapy

Every year, around 300,000 children are born worldwide with β-thalassaemia, a type of hereditary anaemia that, that it presents asymptomatically in most cases, can become fatal. With around 250 million people affected, β-thalassaemia is estimated to be the most common hereditary...

Mitochondrial surprises

The hereditary diseases that scientists are attempting to sidestep can remain According to the endosymbiotic hypothesis, around 1500 million years ago, the mitochrondrion was a bacterium or prokaryotic cell phagocytosed by another to which it provided energy in the form of ATP;...

Gene editing in human embryos. England opened the gates with a scientific community deeply divided in this respect

The United Kingdom Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has approved a request from the Francis Crick Institute to use new gene editing techniques in human embryos for the first time. The research will be led by Dr. Kathy Niakan. The group’s objective is, in...

Children with two genetic mothers and a genetic father from a personalist bioethics perspective

Two genetic mothers practice can genetically modify the germline and cause problems in offspring, by being genetically linked three people: two genetic mothers and a father. On 3rd February 2015, the British House of Commons gave the green light to the possibility of using a...
Posted On 08 May 2015
, By